The Taste of Money DVD Review

Im Sang-soo's The Taste of Money explores the dark underworld of wealthy Korean society; concentrating on one of the countries richest families.

Boys on Film X DVD Review

Peccadillo Pictures’ BOYS ON FILM series consistently ranks itself among the best collections of short films currently available. And (though it fails to hit the heights of this year’s BOYS ON FILM 9) this new compilation is no exception.

I Want Your Love DVD Review

Travis Mathews’ name has been on the tip of everyone’s tongue since his second feature-length film Interior. Leather Bar. (co-directed by James Franco) caused quite a buzz at Sundance earlier this year.

Interview with Matthew Mishory, director of A Portrait of James Dean: Joshua Tree, 1951

Matthew Mishory’s debut feature length film is a speculative biopic of one of Hollywood’s most iconic actors. Set during the years preceding his brief film career, it is an unconventional telling, concerning itself more with tone and poetry, rather than plot. Set primarily in the desert of Joshua Tree national park, the film presents James Dean as a young poet finding his voice; a man on the cusp of greatness, but in many ways innocent to all that surrounded him. Ali Gardiner talks to the director to find out the inspiration and motivation behind the movie.

A Portrait of James Dean: Joshua Tree 1951 – DVD Review

Even if you've never seen a James Dean film, there is one thing you can say for sure: the man was, without a doubt, an icon. That as a stand-alone statement, however, leaves a question open: if we take the definition of icon as “a person or thing that is regarded as a representative symbol of something”, what, then, is James Dean an icon of?

BOYS ON FILM 9: Youth in Trouble – DVD Review

The ninth in their series of collected short films is a fantastic example of why queer cinema is moving out of the closet and into the public eye – without exception, all the shorts featured on BOYS ON FILM 9 stay true to the spirit and purpose of the queer cinema movement, but without alienating heterosexual audiences. This is not only cinema for a minority, but also manages to be cinema that can educate the majority on what it means to be gay.