I Want Your Love DVD Review

Travis Mathews’ name has been on the tip of everyone’s tongue since his second feature-length film Interior. Leather Bar. (co-directed by James Franco) caused quite a buzz at Sundance earlier this year.

Win Travis Mathews I WANT YOUR LOVE on DVD

The hotly anticipated debut feature film from director Travis Mathews (INTERIOR. LEATHER BAR) is a bold and unflinching look at gay relationships among a group of San Francisco friends including scenes of real sex, striking controversy amongst global film censors, including Australia, where the film was banned.

East End Film Festival: Bruno and Earlene Go to Vegas

Bruno & Earlene Go to Vegas focuses primarily on two misguided individuals colliding together in the most unusual of circumstances having been spurned in the past for two wildly varying reasons. They both carry burdens with them when they meet at Venice Beach for the first time and they reluctantly latch onto each other in the hope that they'll each have someone to trust in again.

The Comedian Review

Tom Shkolnik's The Comedian doesn't really have much control over the story that it intends to tell; this could be because of the rules Shkolnik put into place when making the film or because it is just a badly conceived picture, which really isn't saying anything at all.

Interview with Matthew Mishory, director of A Portrait of James Dean: Joshua Tree, 1951

Matthew Mishory’s debut feature length film is a speculative biopic of one of Hollywood’s most iconic actors. Set during the years preceding his brief film career, it is an unconventional telling, concerning itself more with tone and poetry, rather than plot. Set primarily in the desert of Joshua Tree national park, the film presents James Dean as a young poet finding his voice; a man on the cusp of greatness, but in many ways innocent to all that surrounded him. Ali Gardiner talks to the director to find out the inspiration and motivation behind the movie.

A Portrait of James Dean: Joshua Tree 1951 – DVD Review

Even if you've never seen a James Dean film, there is one thing you can say for sure: the man was, without a doubt, an icon. That as a stand-alone statement, however, leaves a question open: if we take the definition of icon as “a person or thing that is regarded as a representative symbol of something”, what, then, is James Dean an icon of?