The Spirit of ’45 Review

The Spirit of ’45, Loach’s most comprehensive documentary of the British working class struggle to date, is a fierce and impassioned celebration of workers’ power and the possibility of collective organisation to ensure services are delivered for people and not profit. Using interviews and archive footage – public information films, news bulletins, footage of election campaign speeches etc – Loach weaves together a narrative that explains how Britain utterly transformed itself after the Second World War.

Human Rights Watch: Camera/Woman Review

The film begins by introducing Khadija Harrad, a middle-aged divorcee living in Casablanca, Morocco. She supports her family by filming wedding videos; the audience is told that it has become increasingly common for the bride to request a camera-woman to record the women-only pre-wedding festivities.

Fire in the Blood Review

Every so often a documentary will come around, which is so important and so powerful that you forget for a moment that you are watching this on your screen and instead start to see the bigger picture and how its subject matter is affecting the greater world around you. Fire in the Blood is an example of when that happens and instead, the audience is progressively given all the facts about something, which is happening outside their very door and something, which can and must be changed.

Side By Side Review

Every so often a documentary is made, which really captures the minds and hearts of its audience. In the last year, the genre, which has often been sidelined to television, has generated some of it's biggest an... Read More...

LFF 2012: Room 237

Room 237 has to be the craziest and zaniest documentary I have ever seen; but what more can you expect when the study is Stanley Kubrick's The Shining?